Trillium Book Awards Author Reading 2015

Ten Questions (Trillium Finalists Series) with Jeramy Dodds

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Ten Questions (Trillium Finalists Series) with Jeramy Dodds

Jeramy Dodds's poems have been translated into Finnish, French, Latvian, Swedish, German and Icelandic. He is the winner of the 2006 Bronwen Wallace Memorial Award and the 2007 CBC Literary Award in poetry. He works as a research archaeologist and co-edits for littlefishcartpress. His debut collection of poetry, Crabwise to the Hounds (Coach House Books, 2008), has been nominated for the 2009 Trillium Book Award.

Enter Open Book's June contest to win an Ontario Authors Prizepack that includes the nine English-language Trillium-nominated books.

OBT:

First, a huge congrats on being a Finalist for the 22nd Annual Trillium Book Awards! Could you tell us about your nominated collection, Crabwise to the Hounds?

JD:

Thank you, I’m quite excited. Crabwise to the Hounds is my first collection of poems. Most of the poems in the book deal with the shortsighted issues of most twenty/thirty-somethings: the gothic natural world of Southern Ontario, love and whether or not the souls of animals are more powerful than our own souls.

OBT:

Did you have a specific readership in mind when you wrote Crabwise to the Hounds?

JD:

No, not really. It all seemed like a cheap shot in the deep deep dark. I suppose I wrote the poems for whoever likes poetry. I was always reading and reading, just taking and taking, so I wanted to give a little to whoever had a moment or two.

OBT:

What were you doing when you received news of your Trillium nomination?

JD:

Minding my own business, working in the garden, getting ready for an early winter.

OBT:

Describe your ideal writing environment.

JD:

A sensory deprivation tank, a mile or so under the Canadian Shield. Only there can we truly write to the rhythm of our inner selves. Anyway, that’s what my mother always says.

OBT:

What was your first publication?

JD:

It was a poem that appeared in Grain, I still remember getting the letter, I was adrenalized.

OBT:

If you had to choose three books as a “Welcome to Ontario” gift, what would those books be?

JD:

Easy. Predators of the Adoration by Christopher Dewdney; Ghost Towns of Ontario I and II by Ron Brown; Bear by Marian Engel.

OBT:

What are you reading right now?

JD:

David O’Meara’s Noble Gas, Penny Black and Edwin Muir’s Selected Poems.

OBT:

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received as a writer?

JD:

“Writing about what you know is for people who know something. You don’t seem like that type of person to me.”

OBT:

What is your next project?

JD:

A translation of the Poetic Edda from Old Norse to English.

OBT:

What advice do you have for writers who are trying to get published?

JD:

Is it really worth it? Or, what’s the rush? Or, have you asked five people who aren’t your BFF to read it first? Or, what about your Olympic dreams?



Read more about Crabwise to the Hounds by Jeramy Dodds at the Coach House website.

For more information on the Trillium Book Award, go to the Ontario Media Development Corporation's website.

2 comments

Joanne Page's interview really got me thinking, particularly when she talks the response to first book, The River and the Lake, and how "half the people in the village were furious with me for using their names and another bunch were miffed not to be in the book."

Here, she specifically used real names of people she knew. What's a finer line is if she changed their names but the characters resembled them so much, they still minded.

I wonder what other people think about this dilemma?

Great reading at the Trillium event! My girlfriend and I voted Jeramy as one of the authors in attendance that we would most like to have a beer with!

Congratulations on winning the Trillium Award for Poetry.

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